Modern kitchen with a built-in wall ovenMost of us think a wall oven works the same way as a conventional slide-in range. In many ways, it’s true. But there are differences you should know about before installing your new oven. I know they’re beautiful pieces of technology, and it’s worthwhile learning a few tips now instead of finding out the hard way!

For years, I’ve seen great installations and some very reckless and dangerous ones, too. After an installation, most customers have no idea what’s behind or around their oven. The assumption is as long as it works, all is good. Please, read on…

Self-Clean Misfortune

Wall ovens require specific minimum distances around the unit providing ample room for air flow. The open space around the oven allows it to cool properly without tripping its internal temperature sensors and stopping operation.

I won’t give specifics here because each unit has its own specifications. My point is, make sure your installers follow the specifications. They’re too important to ignore. I’ve seen too many ovens installed in spaces clearly not designed for them. That said, lack of airflow clearances creates an immediate problem.

A majority of my customers love keeping their ovens clean using the self-clean function. Aside from the steam option, a regular high-heat option remains the common choice. However, in a case of a bad installation, it’s risky to allow ovens to reach high temperatures (750-900°) for extended periods, such as during a self-clean unless proper ventilation allows sufficient airflow.

I should say all ovens I’ve seen with optional self-clean have been tested for high temps, but problems occur when insufficient airflow around the unit prevents proper cooling, tripping high-limit thermostats. This leads to a complete shutdown of the oven, or at least the bake and broil elements.

Electrical Pigtail Too Short

A potentially dangerous and novice-like installation is apparent when electrical installers don’t follow instructions and leave enough slack in the electrical pigtail connecting power to the unit. It’s too late when your wall oven gets removed for repair.

Cartoon electrician with toolboxEnough length in the power cord (pigtail) is essential to allow someone to remove the unit from the wall with enough room to maneuver around the unit while it’s sitting on an oven cart. A pigtail too short makes it impossible to remove the unit without disconnecting the pigtail from the unit, which is awkward, hard to reach, and potentially dangerous.

I should note here most units come pre-wired with a five-foot pigtail attached, but that’s not guaranteed. Please, watch carefully during the installation and insist they add enough length to the pigtail to avoid a disaster whenever the unit needs repair and must be removed from the wall!

Using Shims to Raise or Level the Unit

If an installer uses a block of wood under the unit to raise it high enough to close up gaps at the top of the opening, don’t allow it. Instead, have them use a solid piece of wood with the same footprint as the oven directly under the unit to accomplish this.

Shims shift and crush built-in exhaust vents. They’re not designed to withstand the oven’s weight, which is why they’re recessed underneath. A shim will slip during installation and end up directly below a vent, crushing it when the oven comes to rest.

Confirm Unit is Level

Before the installers leave and ask you to sign off, open the oven and check the slide-out racks. Do they slide out when you open the oven door? If yes, your unit is not level and will create major problems for you.

Hopefully, your installer won’t attempt to use shims mentioned earlier to level the unit. A basic step in a wall oven installation is to make sure the opening is correct according to spec, and level. It’s the installer’s responsibility to correct any problems before attempting installation.

Wooden Blocks Spell Final ThoughtsWe know how frustrating a bad home appliance installation can be. All Neli techs have seen their share; that you can be sure of! I hope the tips I’ve shared with you help make your new wall oven installation a glowing success! I’ve included a link to another article about home appliance installations you might find helpful.

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