Welcome to another edition of Neli’s DIY Appliance Repair Series. We’re looking at the series WDTA80SAKZ Whirlpool dishwasher.

Right from the start I can tell you this is a nice machine. From a technician’s point of view, WP continues to make their machines easier to work on, and they don’t put common parts in ridiculously hard to reach places.

The one thing that stands out from everything is how they now incorporate the drain pump with the sump assembly. That makes for quick and easy replacements when necessary. You can still replace the wash motor, but unless you can make a good hose connection to the wash motor without sacrificing needed space elsewhere, I wouldn’t recommend doing that.

Why not just replace the sump assembly?

Below, I’ve listed the most common error codes and how to access them.

Activating Service Diagnostic Mode

 

ERROR CODE TABLES

 

Error Codes 1

 

The F3E1 thermistor error isn’t common, but it will stop the machine. Be wary if replacing the thermistor doesn’t fix it. If it doesn’t, you might be looking at a new control.

F4E2 heater: Try resetting the control first, before condemning the heater. Just go through accessing diagnostics, then exit out. That should reset everything.

F4E3 heater: I’ve seen this one more often, and it’s usually correct. But don’t trust everything. Check the heater with your meter to be sure.

F6E1 user interface error: In my experience, this is the most common problem with these machines. It’s not rampant because the machines don’t fail often. But when they do, many times the UI is the reason.

F8E1 water inlet error: This one should be obvious but check the water supply to the dishwasher first. If that’s OK, check the screen of the water line next, then check voltage at the water inlet valve. If there’s no power, you may have a harness or control problem.

F8E2 inlet valve error: This one calls for an electrical problem at the input to the valve.

F8E4 overfill error: Sometimes the float switch will check open. When in doubt, replace it. Microswitches can fail even they check good.

F8E5 overfill error: Be concerned about this because when you see it, a flood may already be occurring. When the water trips the float, the drain should turn on, but open the door slowly. Make sure the water is off and the water drained out of the machine. Then check the valve with the door open and closed. It should remain off. If it doesn’t, the valve is receiving power all the time. That’s a control problem. If the valve doesn’t have power but it’s stuck open, replace the water inlet valve.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Error Codes 3

Error Codes 4

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

F8E2 inlet valve error: This one calls for an electrical problem at the input to the valve.

F8E4 overfill error: Sometimes the float switch will check open. When in doubt, replace it. Microswitches can fail even they check good.

F8E5 overfill error: Be concerned about this because when you see it, a flood may already be occurring. When the water trips the float, the drain should turn on, but open the door slowly. Make sure the water is off and the water drained out of the machine. Then check the valve with the door open and closed. It should remain off. If it doesn’t, the valve is receiving power all the time. That’s a control problem. If the valve doesn’t have power but it’s stuck open, replace the water inlet valve.

F10E2 vent wax motor error: If your dishes are always wet regardless if you use JetDry, check the vent wax motor. It might be open, causing the vent to stay closed, preventing the hot air from escaping. But also check other things like the heater itself, and if you selected heated dry.

F10E3 drying fan error: This isn’t common, but it’s something to check while you’re looking at the vent wax motor.

F10E4 diverter error: If you hear a constant whine and then see the error (or not), the diverter motor can’t find home position. The diverter guides water to different parts of the dishwasher based on the cycle used.

F10E5 diverter error: If you see this error, immediately check underneath the machine, near the center. Look for water dripping. If you see it, it’s because the diverter gasket failed. Unless Whirlpool changed the design, the only fix is to replace the sump assembly. But it’s worth checking for a replacement gasket. It might be difficult to access. Removing the sump is the best option to locate and remove the gasket.

We hope you found this information helpful in troubleshooting your dishwasher. Whirlpool dishwashers are excellent machines, and rarely break down, but like every other appliance, they have their moments but luckily fewer than most. If you’re stuck on something, we are here to help you out. That’s what Neli is all about, helping you when repairing your appliances gets a little tough. Feel free to set up a diagnosis appointment and we can walk you through the problem.